Suicide Prevention Best Practices

Suicide Prevention Best Practices

We all want to say that we are great at what we do. I believe we all do our best job. But, no matter what our experience level is, situations arise and we question ourselves: Did I follow best practice? Did I do everything I could? Am I missing something? Do I know what I’m doing? Suicide prevention is often one of those areas that leave us with these thoughts. It is a sensitive and delicate situation. We need to be knowledgeable and have an action plan in place. Rather than give you tips this month, we thought it would be best to provide you with resources to help navigate through these challenging situations. Below, the team of Confident Counselors shares their best resource suggestions for suicide prevention.  Continue reading “Suicide Prevention Best Practices”

Suicide Prevention Apps

Suicide Prevention Apps

(Disclaimer: Apps cannot replace professional help and support. If you are concerned someone is in danger, reach out for professional help immediately and notify the child’s parent or guardian.)

We have the capability to connect to anyone in an instant yet many are feeling more alone and isolated than ever. Social media can have a negative impact on kids who are already dealing with low self-esteem and trauma due to continually comparing themselves to other people’s “highlight reel” that they craft to perfection and choose for the rest of the world to see. It can give the impression that everyone else lives much more glamorous and carefree lives than our own.

The endless cycle of sharing and comparing leads to countless possibilities of cyberbullying. Almost every app and social media outlet have the capacity to lead to cyberbullying. Kids can be constantly bombarded with harassment 24-hours a day, even from the safety of their home or bedroom. Continue reading “Suicide Prevention Apps”

5 Ways to Use Toilet Paper Tubes in School Counseling

school counseling crafts: Toilet Paper Tubes

At Confident Counselors, we love using materials we have at school or home for school counseling crafts. We’ve used coffee filters and tissue boxes, and now we’ve found what to do with those empty toilet paper tubes.

Writing a post on using toilet paper tubes for counseling activities required a great deal of self-restraint on my part. Do you know just how many opportunities there are to make potty puns when writing 500 words on toilet paper rolls? The answer is a LOT. Especially for a woman whose usual demographic is third grade boys. Sorry. Let’s get down to business.

At school I have an entire cabinet filled with recycled items (some might say “trash”) to use for various counseling activities and projects. Toilet paper tubes are among my favorite. Continue reading “5 Ways to Use Toilet Paper Tubes in School Counseling”

5 Effective Ways to Support Families of Students with Autism

5 Ways to Support Families of Children with AutismFinding ways to more effectively support families of students with autism was one of the biggest sources of growth for me as a professional. I watched everyday as parents worked to access needed services, fought against limitations other people imposed on their children, and simply tried to be a good parent to their child. Over time, I found these five ways to be simple and effective strategies to support families of students with autism. Continue reading “5 Effective Ways to Support Families of Students with Autism”

9 Books to Help Military Children


9 Books to Help Military Children

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links

April is Month of the Military Child, a time to celebrate and acknowledge the resiliency children of military service members demonstrate as well as the unique challenges they face and overcome. Over 1.82 million children have at least one parent in the military.  These children face a unique set of challenges, from deployments and homecomings to moving across the country or world. The Military Child Education Coalition estimates that military children move 6-9 times during their K-12 education, facing multiple deployments during that time. Oftentimes, these children and their families are geographically separated from extended family members and therefore rely on the supports provided both by the military community and the education system where they are enrolled.  

In this post, I’ll highlight 3 unique challenges military children face and 9 books to use in counseling to invite discussion.  Continue reading “9 Books to Help Military Children”

5 Ways to Use Tissue Boxes in School Counseling

5 ways to use tissue boxes in school counseling


Inspired by reading
Counselor Keri’s “Five Ways To Use Coffee Filters In School Counseling,” I excitedly went through my resources and office supplies to create and share 5 ways counselors can use tissue boxes in counseling. The recycled tissue boxes below can be used both as craft projects and/or therapeutic tools in groups and individual sessions.

Self-Esteem Magazine Collage Box

Students can create a place to store affirmations, therapeutic letters, awards, and mementoes that help influence one’s sense of pride. It also serves as a nice decoration piece for your desk. This activity will take several sessions to finish, but is well worth the time prompting discussion on building self-worth.        
Continue reading “5 Ways to Use Tissue Boxes in School Counseling”

Supporting Students with Test Anxiety

Supporting Students with Test Anxiety

It’s March already?! When did that happen? During this time of year, we inevitably see a rise in test anxiety for students and staff alike. While we cannot prevent the tests from happening, we can better prepare our students and staff to cope with these challenges. This month’s tips provide suggestions for helping students become more aware of their anxiety, ways to approach test anxiety as a school, and coping skills to manage test anxiety. You will also find that these tips come in handy for school staff at your next professional development day or faculty meeting.

Continue reading “Supporting Students with Test Anxiety”

College Tours: Helping Students and Parents Get the Most

Getting the Most from College ToursFor many high school sophomores and juniors, March starts the beginning of college tours. Many high schools have spring break and March is the busy time for college students, usually between their own breaks and the hustle and bustle of final exams. It’s a great time for high schoolers to tour college campuses as they will get a real flavor for college life.

The thing to remember with college tours is to approach them like going to an all-you-can-eat buffet. You want to go in hungry and leave thoroughly stuffed, and while we are talking about meals, make sure to eat in a dining hall while you’re there. Make sure to soak up everything around you. Be prepared to ask your tour guide lots of questions, and if you are not thoroughly impressed with your tour guide, make a stop to the campus center or library before you leave and don’t be afraid to look like a tourist. Ask questions of the college students that walk past you. Ask them what they like about the college or how long did it take to adjust from being away from home. Here is where you will get your honest answers. Continue reading “College Tours: Helping Students and Parents Get the Most”

12 Books to Help Kids Overcome Test Anxiety

Do you know a child that underperforms on tests no matter how much they study and prepare? Do they struggle to concentrate during exams because they are preoccupied with thoughts of failing?  Do they find it difficult to recall information that previously came to them with ease? If this sounds like a child you know, they might be experiencing test anxiety. Although it’s normal for kids to feel some degree of anxiety about taking a test, when that anxiety impedes their ability to perform, test anxiety is the likely culprit. Continue reading “12 Books to Help Kids Overcome Test Anxiety”

School Counselor: Advocating for Your Role

Advocating for the Role of a School CounselorWhat do school counselors do? As professionals, we are continually answering this question as we advocate for our profession. To promote advocacy, the American School Counselor Association suggests to “speak up, reach out, and always use your data.” Counselors sometimes feel uncomfortable as they try to show their worth as a school counselor, but advocacy is necessary and will ultimately demonstrate how students are different because of what school counselors do. Here are some excellent tips and resources from Confident Counselors to assist you in advocating for your profession.

Continue reading “School Counselor: Advocating for Your Role”