12 Books to Help Kids Overcome Test Anxiety

Do you know a child that underperforms on tests no matter how much they study and prepare? Do they struggle to concentrate during exams because they are preoccupied with thoughts of failing?  Do they find it difficult to recall information that previously came to them with ease? If this sounds like a child you know, they might be experiencing test anxiety. Although it’s normal for kids to feel some degree of anxiety about taking a test, when that anxiety impedes their ability to perform, test anxiety is the likely culprit. Continue reading “12 Books to Help Kids Overcome Test Anxiety”

Bibliotherapy and Diversity

Bibliotherapy and Diversity

Finding the Words: Bibliotherapy & Diversity

How does one “teach” others to be respectable citizens who appreciate and even celebrate the unique qualities of others?  Is it possible to teach that in a lesson?  Most would argue that being a model of such behavior is a crucial first step.  The way we educators talk about and react to others will have the greatest impact on our youth.  They are watching us.  They can spot a fake.  They will know if we practice what we preach.  So, before we even begin trying to teach cultural competency, we have to live it.  But, we can do better than live it.  We can CELEBRATE it.

Continue reading “Bibliotherapy and Diversity”

Bully Nation

The B-Word

by Laurie P. Mendoza, MA, CAGS

I’d like to recommend a book that has changed the way I look at the issue of bullying and aggression at my school.  Turn on the news, listen to discussions among parents and school staff, or think of how often kids say to you, “He’s bullying me!”  It seems that we’re in the middle of a bullying epidemic, doesn’t it?

It may seem that way, but we’re not.

bully-nation
Bully Nation by Susan Eva Porter

In her book Bully Nation, Susan Eva Porter totally dismantles the widely-accepted notion that kids are under siege from bullies 24/7.  While she provides a number of good reasons why we have that impression, one is so obvious that I can’t believe it never occurred to me: the definition of bullying has expanded hugely in the last ten years or so.

Bullying used to be defined as some form of coercion—forcing someone, usually smaller, to do something they didn’t want to do—often via physical force. It was pretty clear, and most people could agree if something constituted bullying or not.  But in the last decade behaviors that used to be considered just plain mean or even routine kid stuff are now being called bullying. Continue reading “Bully Nation”