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Career Stress

How do you keep a healthy work-life balance?

We talk about self-care and work-life balance a lot on Confident Counselors, and for good reason. This is a tough job that comes with a lot of rewards. BUT if you aren’t thoughtful about caring for yourself, you not only won’t be able to effectively care for others, you will burn out. #realtalk.

 

Three Confident Counselors, including myself, share how we care for ourselves and keep our boundaries around work.

 

Mrs. Bell The Crafty Counselor

I have learned keeping a healthy work-life balance has made be a better version of myself, allowing me to better care for everyone else. I maintain a healthy work/life balance by doing three things.

 

Leaving work at an appropriate time.

There is always so much that needs to be done; at some point, you have to shut your work brain down and go home. When you leave, you have to leave behind the job and all that comes with it. I find that going for a walk before I go home helps me leave the work baggage at the door. Read More »

Career Stress, Monthly CCC Tips

Handling Uncomfortable Conversations with Staff and Parents

uncomfortable conversations with staff and parents are a part of school counselor's jobs. A few tips to make these awkward, but important conversations easier.

I have a saying, “If it’s uncomfortable, give it to the counselor.”

 

Any time that an awkward or uncomfortable conversation needs to take place with a parent, staff member, or volunteer, counselors are called to use our skills to smooth the way for those involved.

 

Uncomfortable conversations include discussing parenting skills, classroom management, disclosing abuse, or speaking with a parent about their child’s suicidal ideation. Sometimes uncomfortable conversations escalate and become uncomfortable for you as the counselor. Read More »

Career Stress, Parents, School Culture, Teacher Consultation

7 Simple Ways to Calm an Angry Parent and Improve Parent Communication

parent communication angry parents

From time to time, you are going to have a conversation with an angry parent. No matter how hard you try and how much you give, there will eventually be somebody who gets upset for one reason or the other. Remembering some simple rules for dealing with angry parents can help you improve your parent communication skills.

Before you can begin to speak rationally with a parent who is upset, you must first try to discover the source of the anger. Knowing how a parent has arrived at their current state can be critical information in communicating effectively with them. Read More »

Career Stress, Parents

Positivity Works: Stepping Out of Negativity

In my third year of my school counseling career, a student asked me “What’s wrong with you Mrs. Atkins? You used to smile.” Wow, out of the mouths of babes, right? The daily grind of our work can start to grind down the positivity that brought us into this helping career in the first place. I know that not only had my attitude suffered but so did my relationships with students. Read More »

Career Stress

6 Surefire Ways to Say No to Non-Counseling Duties

6 sure fire ways to say no to non-counseling duties

 

As counselors, we are driven by nature to help, nurture, and solve problems. Therefore, most of us don’t like to say no to any request. This creates a problem because there are only so many hours in the day and we have more than enough counseling duties of our own to fill those hours. So, obviously there is no extra time for non-counseling duties. Below are several tips to strengthen your “saying no” skills in the most pleasant and professional manner possible.

 

How to Stay in Your Lane

Many of us have ratios or class sizes that far exceed what is recommended in the number of students we can effectively serve. As a result, we are always busy- planning for students, working with students, and following up with families. Therefore, saying no to excessive duties outside of our job role is a really important skill for all counselors to utilize. Below are six of the most effective ways to deflect those non-counseling duties.

Read More »

Advocacy, Career Stress

Self-Care for School Counselors: How To Prioritize Your Day

School Counselor Self-Care

It is no secret that school counselors wear A LOT of hats throughout the school year. We are stretched in many different directions and can be left feeling “spent” by the end of each day. Self-care for school counselors can be a challenge. Although counselors are great at encouraging others to practice self-care, it can be difficult to put it into practice in our own lives. When we take the time to rest, recharge, and practice self-care, we become more effective at helping others.  Read More »

Career Stress

The Importance of Self-Care

Self Care for School Counselors

Do you practice regular self-care? Many counselors preach self-care to others but often fail to follow their own advice. According to the American Counseling Association, the term self-care refers to “the activities and practices that are engaged in on a regular basis to maintain and enhance a person’s health and well-being.” When counselors don’t practice regular self-care, it’s easy to become overwhelmed with stress and eventually burnout. This is why it’s important to have a self-care plan in place.

Our lives can get hectic at times with deadlines, meetings, and unforeseen crises. We become obsessed with crossing off tasks on our to-do lists and lose sight of everything else. When we feel overwhelmed, self-care is usually the first thing to go out the window. Somehow taking time out to tend to our needs becomes a luxury and we feel guilty even thinking about taking time out for ourselves. Read More »

Career Stress, School Culture